National Institute for Urban School Improvement
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Curriculum

  • "Making Connections:" An International Literary Project. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1996 (Bulgaria and Romania)
    This paper describes a project designed to create a student literary magazine that would explore and compare the childhoods and the cultural rites of passage of Romanian, Bulgarian, and U.S. students.
  • A Learner Centered Education
    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel.
  • Between the World and the Village: The Role of Education in Sustaining and Developing an Eritrean Cultural Identity
    The role of education in the development of an Eritrean cultural identity is explored against the background of a review of relevant educational provisions in pluralist societies. Multicultural education in Eritrea offers access to a common culture and also to a variety of specific cultures.
  • Calendars and Thinking Logically
    Presents a mini-lesson and describes the "Calendars and Thinking Logically" curriculum designed to combat the belief that mystical powers are associated with numbers on the calendar and to introduce the complex interplay of physical phenomena, religion, and science in an interdisciplinary way. The curriculum is designed for adolescents and young adults.
  • CIRCA 2000: Curriculum Intervention for Reading Comprehension & Achievement
    Presents an essay that is the result of group-centered activities by graduate students and a faculty mentor in a leadership training program for prospective educational administrators in California. Notes that the class produced some forward-moving and future-thinking core recommendations for reading improvement and achievement in multicultural settings.
  • Discomfort Zones: Learning about Teaching with Care and Discipline in Urban Schools
    Multicultural principles, discipline, and curriculum theory should be integrated and revisited across the teacher-education program via case studies, portfolio assessment, and field experiences. Authors deplore prescriptive, procedural approaches to teaching and value ongoing faculty/student conversations, university alliances with "best" teachers and principals, and trust in children's power.
  • Everybody's Story
    Describes Happy Medium School, Seattle (Washington), a school in which diversity is respected and exploring diversity is an essential part of the curriculum. Teachers at this school regard school as a part of each student's extended family and consider things that happen at home to be a legitimate topic for classroom discussion.
  • Including Students with Disabilities in Standards Based Education Reform
    When all students participate in a challenging general curriculum, when educators, service providers and parents share high expectations that all students can attain high standards, rely on state-of-the-art knowledge and instructional strategies, and when we effectively use information gathered from the assessment process to inform both progress and systems improvement, a standards-based educational system can successfully benefit students with disabilities.
  • Integrating Irish Children's Literature into a Multicultural Curriculum
    Examines ways in which children's literature reflecting the Irish can be effectively integrated into a multicultural curriculum. Uses J.
  • Multicultural Education and the Standards Movement: A Report from the Field
    The current obsession with standardizing curricula and measuring output may further reduce teacher agency and marginalize segments of our society that are already cheated by the system. Enormous discrepancies exist among public-school facilities, resources, and teachers.
  • Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools
    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD).
  • Race and Ethnicity Issues in the Sociology Curriculum
    Shows why the sociology curriculum in English education fails to acknowledge the multicultural nature of British society and ways in which sociology teachers can improve things through their own research and teaching. British teachers and students can learn about cultural differences together.
  • Second-Grade Journeys on the Underground Railroad
    Describes a curriculum used in a second grade classroom to expose the predominantly white students to the culture and experiences of African Americans through a study of slavery and the Underground Railroad. Includes a bibliography of African folk tales and literature related to the African American experience.
  • Serving Children in Biracial/Bi-Ethnic Families: A Supplementary Diversity Curriculum for the Training of Child Care Providers.
    Because of increasing numbers of children from biracial/bi-ethnic families attending childcare programs and increasing awareness of cultural diversity, and in recognition of the connection between a child's success and his or her racial/ethnic self-esteem, this curriculum is intended to help childcare providers integrate activities and materials that focus specifically on biracial/bi-ethnic children into existing multicultural or other curricula. Facilitated discussions that promote the sharing of ideas and experiences are core elements of this curriculum.
  • Significance of Ethnomathematical Research: Towards International Cooperation with the Developing Countries
    Development assistance was started for the sake of reconstruction of Europe shattered by World War II, and turned its attention to north- south problems starting at the Development Decade by the United Nations in 1960. In spite of all the efforts the international community has made, the situation for poor countries seems to have worsened and many insurmountable problems still lie ahead.
  • Student Movements for Multiculturalism: Challenging the Curricular Color Line in Higher Education
    This book explores whether courses that focus on issues such as race/ethnicity, cultural diversity, cultural pluralism, and ethnic studies should be required for bachelor's degrees. The study focuses on the American cultures breadth requirement at the University of California-Berkeley and the ethnic studies requirement at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, showing how student demands for multiculturalism in the curriculum resulted in these requirements.
  • Supplementary Schools--Their Service to Education
    Discusses how supplementary schools in Britain are as much needed now by the black community as they ever were before. The development of African-Caribbean supplementary schooling, some common features of the supplementary school movement and the curriculum it offers, and supplementary school funding are examined, including a brief discussion on Asian supplementary schools.
  • The Business Education Index 1996. Index of Business Education Articles and Research Studies Compiled from a Selected List of Periodicals Published during the Year 1996. Volume 57
    This index, which was compiled from a selected list of 45 periodicals published in 1996, lists more than 2,000 business education articles and research studies. Articles are listed under the following subject categories and subcategories: basic business, communications, curriculum, document, general educational issues,information systems, personnel issues,teaching issues,teaching strategies .
  • The Business Education Index 1996. Index of Business Education Articles and Research Studies Compiled from a Selected List of Periodicals Published during the Year 1996. Volume 57
    This index, which was compiled from a selected list of 45 periodicals published in 1996, lists more than 2,000 business education articles and research studies. Articles are listed under the following subject categories and subcategories: basic business, curriculum,document design and production, general educational issues, information systems,office management,personnel issues, research methodology/issues; teaching issues, teaching strategies, and training and development .
  • The Eight Curricula of Multicultural Citizenship Education
    Describes eight curricula that interact simultaneously in multicultural and citizenship education: the prescribed (or intended) curriculum, the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum, the reported curriculum, the hidden curriculum, the missing curriculum, the external curriculum, and the learned curriculum. Notes the importance of researchers in the field of multicultural and citizenship education paying attention to these curricula.
  • The Impact of Undergraduate Diversity Course Requirement on Students' Racial Views and Attitudes
    Describes a study that found that students who were about to complete their undergraduate diversity requirement exhibited significantly less prejudice and made more favorable judgments about African Americans, compared with students who were just beginning this requirement. Emphasizes the educational value of diversity-related curricular initiatives.
  • The Impact of Undergraduate Diversity Course Requirement on Students' Racial Views and Attitudes
    Describes a study that found that students who were about to complete their undergraduate diversity requirement exhibited significantly less prejudice and made more favorable judgements about African Americans, compared with students who were just beginning this requirement. Emphasizes the educational value of diversity-related curricular initiatives.
  • Writing for Their Lives: The Non-School Literacy of California‚Äôs Urban African American Youth.
    This article reports on an investigation into the literacy practices of urban African American youth, many of whom were found to be unmotivated to engage in school-based literacy events because they do not see the relevance of the school curriculum to their lives or, based on prior experiences, they actually fear having to write in school.